Posts

Showing posts from April, 2005

Too much IT jargon?

"It says something of the times that the latest great hoax has not been foisted upon the art and literary world but the jargon-laden internet industry." To read the rest of the article and discover the hoax, visit The Australian.

More cybercrime

LexisNexis has disclosed that criminals may have breached computer files containing the personal information of 310,000 people. The personal information was apparently accessed by unauthorised individuals using stolen passwords and IDs.

Read more here.

Spam containment?

CNN reports on the new strategy for dealing with spam: containment.

Euthanasia and a proposed internet ban

The Criminal Code Amendment (Suicide Related Material Offences) Bill 2005 aims to stop use of the Internet, the telephone and faxes for communication that "counsels or incites suicide." (More information is contained in The Explanatory Memorandum to the Bill.)

Critics have contended that this would threaten Australia's freedom of political communication, as well as freedom of the press and rational adults' right to have access to information. Electronic Frontiers Australia has made a submission to the Senate Committee inquiry.

Dr Philip Nitschke has also suggested that banning the spread of information on voluntary euthanasia over the Internet could boost the number of people who commit suicide. Read more here.

Should the internet be regulated in this way?

Another way to deal with content regulation

Another solution to the content regulation issue may be for parents to make an internet use agreement with their child. That's one option presnted by GetNetWise.

What do you think of this approach?

E-tendering

In Monday's class we will be looking at a case study of e-commerce implementation: e-tendering. The discussion will be informed by a recent report of Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation (CRC CI) .

The report was the result of collaboration between project members, researchers and affiliates from the CRC CI, QUT (Law, IT/Security and BEE), University of Newcastle, Queensland Crown Law, Queensland Department of Public Works, Queensland Department of Main Roads, and Brisbane City Council.

The report can be accessed here. (You will need your QUT Access usernsame and password to open the file.) Although an overview of the report will be presented in class, if you are interested it may be useful to have a browse through the report before class.

Parents use of internet filtering software

Another report updating some of the issues we discussed in our class on content regulation.

In the United States, more and more parents are using internet filtering software, according to a report by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Robert MacMillan of the Washington provides a summary here, and the full report is available here.

Content Regulation in China

In class a few weeks ago, we considered content regulation in China. Now, a study by the OpenNet Initiative has found that the Chinese government's Internet controls have kept pace with rapid changes in technology and are buttressed by self-censorship.

For a summary of the findings, click here.

Web Wrap Agreements

There is an important recent decision upholding web-wrap agreements. Register.com v. Verio http://www.icann.org/registrars/register.com-verio/decision-23jan04.pdf.

In that case, one of the three appeal judges died while writing the decision. (He was dissenting). This case has special circumstances -- repeated use of website and bad conduct -- so even though it is from an important court, I am not sure if it will be followed in all circumstances.

More on the Yahoo Nazi paraphernalia case

For another aspect of the French Yahoo case involving auctions of Nazi paraphernalia that were once held on Yahoo's web site, referred to in this blog on 29 March, click here. The article discusses the finding of a Paris appeals court to uphold a decision to throw out accusations by French human rights activists who said that Yahoo should be held legally responsible for the auctions.

Regulation of political blogs?

Here is an interesting article on the Federal Election Commission in the United States considering whether to regulate political blogging.

What do you think?

Yahoo Japan sued in class action

YAHOO Japan has been sued by customers for scams on its site in the nation's first class-action suit seeking compensation from an online auction broker.

A total of 572 people across Japan paid via Yahoo for auctioned items such as liquid-crystal televisions and digital cameras but did not receive the goods, said Noboru Mizuno, who leads the group.

To read more, click here.

Google in the news

Links for session on Content Regulation

Is Amazon becoming Big Brother?

From the Associated Press:

"Amazon.com Inc. has one potentially big advantage over its rival online retailers: It knows things about you that you may not know yourself.

"Though plenty of companies have detailed systems for tracking customer habits, critics and boosters alike say Amazon is the trailblazer, having collected information longer and used it more proactively. It even received a patent recently on technology aimed at tracking information about the people for whom its customers buy gifts."

Read more here.

Should we be concerned about our privacy? Or is it making online shopping more convenient? What does Amazon's Privacy Policy say?