Google's GDrive

Google revealed last week that it had inadvertently disclosed its closely guarded financial projections and also let slip information about a personal, digital storage service that is in the work, known as GDrive. GDrive would be an online storage service that would give users an alternative to storing data on their personal computer hard drives. Such a service could allow users to get access to their files wherever they are, whether from a laptop, cell phone or personal digital assistant.

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Comments

Floris said…
Online storage and remote access is not a particularly new technology since it is already offered by Box.net, Xdrive and Yahoo. However, the GDrive will offer significantly larger storage and is part of a broader plan to move all data online. It has been predicted that this new service will give Google a significant advantage over its rivals such as Microsoft.

The ability to access all types of information anywhere around the world without the need for disks or computers will appeal to many users. Others will be more cautious or reluctant to store their personal data on a commercial server due to the privacy and security risks involved. As discussed this week in class, identity theft is a serious problem with no clear answer. For this system to work, the public will need to trust Google and the measures put in place.

Since this is only a recent announcement, many unanswered questions remain:

-Will the information and data stored be used for any marketing purposes? Will advertising be used?

-Will Google guarantee privacy and security and, if so, how exactly will this be done? For example, will encryption be offered?

-How will Google manage to make a profit from offering this storage space to the public? Will a fee be charged?

-Could personal information be accessed by law enforcement for disclosure purposes via subpoena?

-What are the technical concerns? (ie system crashing)

-Is it wise or appropriate for any one entity to be in control of all information? The GDrive may lead to Google holding a monopoly over both private and public information.

Ultimately, freedom of choice remains and the GDrive’s success will be based upon its public approval and use.

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