Thursday, September 27, 2012

Hobart.com Domain Name Sale

An Australian domain name company has sold Hobart.com.au for $65,000 to a website hosting business after purchasing the website for just $875 back in 2005, highlighting the potential riches in buying and selling geographic domains.
See Article

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Google Sued in New Zealand, and wins

Google NZ was sued for defamation.  The lawsuit was dismissed on summary judgment, because it was decided that the Google NZ entity was not carrying on business in New Zealand and had no control over the search engine.  The court left open the question of whether Google is responsible for defamatory material that it produces from its search engine.
See NZ Court Decision (A v. Google New Zealand Ltd) and comment.

Facebook Photo Removed

A business was found to have breached advertising standards in relation to a photo on Facebook.  See Smart Company

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Donuts Applies for Most gTLDs

The single most aggressive bidder for lucrative new web domains is a little-known investment group: Donuts Inc. Its $57 million play for 307 new domains - more than Google, Amazon and Allstate combined - has prompted alarm among industry groups and internet watchdogs.

See SMH

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Employees Violating Computer Misuse Policy

In July, the Fourth Circuit weighed in on the scope of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) in WEC Carolina Energy Solutions, LLC v. Miller and found that the CFAA is not broad enough to impose liability on an employee who has lawful access to his employer's electronic information but later misuses that information - such as by stealing the employer's electronic trade secrets. In taking this narrow approach to the CFAA and siding with the Second and Ninth Circuits, the Fourth Circuit has widened the circuit split over whether the CFAA applies to disloyal employees who violate the computer use policies of their employer. In this Legal Alert, Audra Dial and John Moye discuss the Fourth Circuit's recent ruling and its impact for employers drafting computer use policies as well as companies pursuing trade secret claims through the CFAA.

See kilpatrickstockton.com